Baptiste Power Vinyasa

Victor Boullet is an artist whose work I was first introduced to at an exhibition at the Patriothall Gallery in the 2010 Edinburgh Art Festival. I was suddenly caught up in his very editing-esque way of working. My favourite work of his there was an edited version of an expedition to the Antarctic where the adventurers had to eat their loyal companions, their dogs. It struck me as incredibly sad, and seemed almost cinematic in quality.

As I gazed up at the large photocopies of the book and read them it certainly felt as if I was in a theatre watching the words on the page/stage. I do not know if this was intended but I found it incredibly interesting.

Another work there I found intriguing was the pillars that had been encased in the room. At least that is what I thought they were. Some of the encased pillars were actually just the encasement – they were protecting nothing and concealing nothing. Victor’s association is called “The Institute of Social Hypocrisy” named so after the hypocritical title, as the institute is not so much an institute but a band of artists. Either that or it might be just him, it was a while ago so forgive me if I’m wrong.

The final piece I experienced that evening was the first sound piece I had encountered in person. It was an edited version of a conversation between John Cage and Morton Feldman which involved a lot of laughter from both the audience and the artwork.

I was given the work on CD at the end of the playing. I am still unsure why he chose me to have the work, but he told me only to play it once more and never to anyone else. I’m still to play the piece.

So yes I hope this explanation of the work I saw at “I pretend to Like Harold Pinter” kind of goes with the video at the top of the screen that I just made. It was one of the most important exhibitions of my life so far. Thank you Victor Boullet!

http://www.boullet.com/

BODYPUMP 73 BICEPS

Take it down

slow for four

right down to the chest

nice and slow

four

set it up

and again

four

and take it up.

Three and One,

right there yeah

Two

Three

and up.

Raise it.

Up.

Change the pace,

Two and Two!

Hit it,

come on

let’s lift it up,

reach it up,

focus.

Again.

Now,

take it slow

one down three up one down three up

smooth,

slow,

fire it up a notch.

Little baby ones and keep it tight.

Four more,

Four

Do it uhuh, two

Let’s shut it down

singles

yeah let’s do it

woo.

Keep it tight,

c’mon raise it up.

Strong.

Smooth.

Two, one more, slow it down.

Knees in, up, again

over four

and up, feel it.

three

and

one

and

up

and

tight.

Feel the squeeze, feel the press.

Two by two,

hit it

woo.

Up!

One more, wide and strong right here.

Change the pace.

c’mon don’t

rush.

one up three down.

One more, open it up.

keep it tight, open it up.

Two!

Feel it!

Let’s go singles,

woohoohoo!

c’mon and up

four more and feel it

Two

One more

okay,

 

stretch it out, hold it now, woo, ow, oo!

 

Two Three Nice and Slow

and up again.

Slow it down.

Let’s take it up.

Three and one.

Go.

Let’s life it up.

We’re almost

there now!

And

Smash it!

super smooth woo!

yeah

let’s do it.

One more

are you ready?

little ones

four

elbows in.

Keep it going yeah.

Singles.

Up

Down

Hey

Let’s go

Five

Don’t stop

Six

Seven and

Eight!

Fine.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Saturday

Sunday

woohoo!

uh!

Singles!

c’mon

oh yeah

feel the tightness,

feel the squeeze,

Two,

Do some more!

One and up.

Two and up.

Three.

C’mon.

Keep it going!

Six,

Seven, and

Eight!

 

We’re going down.

Sol Lewitt scribblings

Whilst working out the possibilities for the extension lead system I realised my workings felt very similar to Sol Lewitt’s.

^Sol Lewitt’s

\/ Gordon Douglas’s

So yeah, I may try and make the scribblings an integral part to my work just as Lewitt’s was as I feel my scribblings look very aesthetically pleasing. Or I may leave wall drawing instructions like he did.. I need to look into Lewitt again.

Here’s a picture of one of his cubes:

Francesca Nobilucci

Ms Nobilucci gave an artist talk at Telford maybe a year and a half ago which I grealty enjoyed. I’ve only realised that on of her artworks may have slipped into my unconscious from the talk and influenced some of my recent works.

Kitchen Riot depicts 20 kettles attached to extension cables. It brings to mind a hectic morning where there has to be lots of tea made.

It uses imaginary extension cables to cope with this, having plugs that can face both ways to make for the most kettles in the available space.

I’m not too sure what its really about so I should maybe ask her and get back to this.